RSS Feeds

  Cyndi's List

DNA Kit Sales in Honor of Mother's Day (Fri, 12 May 2017)

>> Read More

A Personal Milestone for Me and Cyndi's List (Thu, 11 May 2017)

>> Read More

National DNA Day Sales Are Here (Fri, 21 Apr 2017)

>> Read More

PRESS RELEASE: 20 Years of Cyndi's List (Fri, 04 Mar 2016)

>> Read More

Genealogy Insider

Why FamilySearch Is Ending Microfilm Rental & How to Get Genealogy Records Now (Wed, 28 Jun 2017)
Guest blog post by Family Tree Magazine Contributing Editor Sunny Jane Morton For 80 years, the FamilySearch Family History Library (FHL) has made its enormous stash of microfilmed genealogy records available to researchers through an inexpensive rental service through local FamilySearch Centers. That's about to change: FamilySearch has announced that this service will end Aug. 31. Reasons include declining demand for film, dramatic increases in the costs of reproducing films, and the difficulty of supporting aging microfilm technology. It’s easy to be dismayed by the news, even when you acknowledge it was bound to happen. Many of us have solved family history mysteries with these microfilmed records.  Fortunately, most FamilySearch microfilm is already been digitized and posted on the free FamilySearch website or another genealogy site. That's more than 1.5 million rolls, including the most popular ones. “The remaining [eligible] microfilms should be digitized by the end of 2020," according to the announcement. "All new records from its ongoing global efforts are already using digital camera equipment." I've been a grateful user of the film rental program. And the millions of records FamilySearch makes available online for free more than offset offsets this inconvenience to my research. But after Aug. 31 and before 2020, what can we do about accessing records that aren't yet digitized? Try these seven ideas: 1. Keep using the FamilySearch online catalog of the FHL's books and microfilmed records. You can order microfilm up through Aug. 31 (click here to see how); you'll get 90 days to view the film. When digitized films are posted at FamilySearch, the item's catalog entry links to the online collection. Even if you don’t find a borrowable item in the catalog, it's useful for identifying records you may be able to access elsewhere (see below). Here are our tips on searching the catalog. 2. Check other libraries. If you find a noncirculating item described in the FamilySearch catalog, click the link to view the catalog record in WorldCat. It'll take you to this item's listing in WorldCat, a free catalog of holdings in libraries around the world. You'll see libraries that have the item, and link to their lending policies. You may discover records in other formats, such as digitized, in a book or original manuscript records. 3. Search for digitized versions of the records. Search the web for the names and descriptions of records you've identified in the FamilySearch catalog. You may find digitized versions at free sites such as HathiTrust, Internet Archive, state library websites, and others. Also search the database catalogs on genealogy websites such as Ancestry.com, MyHeritage and Findmypast. 4. Visit a genealogy library such as ... Family History Library in Salt Lake City, which will maintain its non-digitized microfilm collection in-house New England Historic Genealogical Society in Boston Daughters of the American Revolution Library in Washington, D.C. state archives and repositories, such as the Ohio Genealogical Society Library and the California Genealogical Society Library libraries in your ancestral hometowns and the 10 road trip-worthy public libraries on our list 5. Use library lookup and photocopy services. Some libraries fill requests for lookups and photocopies for a fee. Check the website or call for instructions; usually, you must provide the book or microfilm title and specifics such as a name, date or page number. Firms offering research at the FHL include Genealogists.com. 6. Hire a researcher. If you need someone to search through records—not just check an index or flip to the page you specify and copy it—consider hiring a researcher by the hour. Many libraries offer in-house research services, or they may supply a list of local researchers. 7. Find original records. It might be easier to access original records, if they exist, than microfilmed versions. Start with the FamilySearch catalog listing. Look for the name of the repository that provided the original records (often under "Author"). Search that repository’s website to see if the records are still there. Another option is to search ArchiveGrid, a catalog of archival items in US repositories. Here's how to use ArchiveGrid. FamilySearch's renewed focus on digital efforts means its free online genealogy resources will grow even faster. Watch ShopFamilyTree.com for my Aug. 21 webinar on the free FamilySearch website, in which I'll share my search tricks for getting the most out of this website. Meanwhile, grab my must-have comparison of the "big three" commercial sites, Ancestry, Findmypast and MyHeritage. I'll help you decide which one's right for you. SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave
>> Read More

Ancestors in the CCC? Search Online Camp Newspapers from Virginia! (Fri, 23 Jun 2017)
If your ancestor or other relative was part of the New Deal Civilian Conservation Corps program, camp newspapers are great for learning about his experience. And it's getting easier to access CCC camp newspapers from Virginia (plus a few from outside Virginia). CCC workers, Library of Congress The Virginia Newspapers Project has announced that CCC camp newspapers from the Library of Virginia's collection, published from 1934 to 1941 by young men participating in the CCC, are being digitized on the Virginia Chronicle newspaper website. The papers were originally microfilmed by the Center for Research Libraries in 1991. The Camp Victory Crier, for example, was published in Yorktown, Va. Page two of this issue names staff including editor in chief Oliver J. Wilson, other editors, press men and reporters. Click here to browse the CCC newspapers already on Virginia Chronicle. To search these and other newspapers on the site, use the keyword search box on the home page or the Advanced Search, which lets you specify a date range and newspaper title to search. Here's a guide to the Library of Virginia's collection of CCC camp newspapers. Looking for more CCC history websites and old records of CCC camps and workers? See our genealogy Q&A on how to research a CCC worker on FamilyTreeMagazine.com. SaveSaveSaveSaveSave
>> Read More

Computergenealogie Newsletter

69. Deutscher Genealogentag in Dresden (Tue, 13 Jun 2017)
Zum allerersten Mal in seiner langen Geschichte wird der Deutsche Genealogentag der DAGV vom 22. bis 25.9.2017 in Dresden stattfinden. Der Dresdner Verein für Genealogie e.V. lädt zum größten überregionalen Treffen von Ahnen- und Familienforschern unter dem Motto: "Europa in unseren Wurzeln, Sachsen und seine Nachbarn". Die Ausstellung findet im World Trade Center Dresden und die Tagung im Hotel Elbflorenz statt, welches trockenen Fußes vom WTC aus erreichbar ist. Erstmals gibt es einen Frühbucherrabatt, den bereits über 250 Interessenten genutzt haben. Für 19 Euro ist eine komplette Tagungsteilnahme möglich. Über die Website kann man sich anmelden. Das genaue Programm wird Mitte Juni veröffentlicht. Dann endet auch der Frühbucherrabatt.
>> Read More

Projekt-Informationen (Tue, 13 Jun 2017)
DES-Verlustlisten Auf Genealogy.net wurde eine weitere spannende militärische Quelle für die Datenerfassung bereitgestellt, dieses Mal aus dem 2. Weltkrieg. Es handelt sich um die "Zusammenstellung der Personalverluste der Luftwaffen (nichtfliegendes Personal) Stalingrad". Die Akte gehörte zum Bestand der Kriegswissenschaftlichen Abteilung der Luftwaffe. Die Scans stammen aus einem US-Archiv. Die Liste wurde am 7. November 1944 abgeschlossen. Da die Liste mit der Schreibmaschine geschrieben wurde und jeder Eintrag relativ kurz ist, eignet sich die Quelle ideal für den Einstieg in die Erfassung mit dem DES. DES-Adressbücher Neue Adressbücher wurden zur Erfassung online gestellt.: * Burgstädt 1937. Um die Erfassung komfortabler zu gestalten, wurden 4 Orte mit einer Straßenauswahlliste versehen. * Ratibor 1926. Das offline teilerfasste Adressbuch soll im DES komplettiert werden. Fertig erfasste Adressbücher sind: * Halberstadt 1928: 19 Freiwillige erfassten in 6 Monaten 431 Seiten mit 31.457 Einträgen. Suche der Daten hier. * Karlsruhe 1818: Innerhalb von 6 Wochen erfassten 8 Freiwillige 94 Seiten mit 4.481 Einträgen. Suche der Daten hier. * Schlettau 1903: Innerhalb von 1 Woche erfassten 4 Freiwillige 43 Seiten mit 1.300 Einträgen. Suche der Daten hier. * Adressbuch Naumburg 1949: Innerhalb von 4 Monaten erfassten 13 Freiwillige die restlichen185 Seiten mit 22.637 Einträgen. Suche der früher offline erfassten Daten und der neuen Daten im DES. * Lüdinghausen 1908: 3 Freiwillige bearbeiteten 13 Seiten mit 615 Einträgen. Suche der Daten hier. * Halle 1941: 42 Freiwillige erfassten seit Mai 2015 457 Seiten mit insgesamt 97.574 Einträgen. Suche der Daten hier. * Zabrze 1912: Innerhalb von 3 Monaten erfassten 9 Freiwillige die restlichen 325 Seiten mit 26.941 Einträgen. Ein besonderer Dank geht an eine neu hinzu gekommene Erfasserin, die allein 18.000 Datensätze bearbeitet hat. Suche der früher offline erfassten Daten und der im DES erfasste Daten. * Saalkreis 1920: Im Zeitraum von 2 Monaten erfassten 7 Freiwillige 322 Seiten mit 20.624 Einträgen. Auch hier ein besonderer Dank an eine Freiwillige, die allein mehr als 12.000 Datensätze erfasst hat. Suche der Daten hier. (Susanne Nicola und Joachim Buchholz) Grabsteine Neue Dokumentationen wurden im Mai 2017 u.a. auf Friedhöfen folgender Landkreise/Kreise erstellt: Vogelsbergkreis, Karlsruhe, Wetteraukreis, Marburg-Biedenkopf, Rhein-Lahn-Kreis, Region Hannover, Spree-Neiße, Oder-Spree, Elbe-Elster, Segeberg, Rendsburg-Eckernförde, Stormarn. Allen "Grabsteinern" ein herzliches Dankeschön für die geleistete Mitarbeit! (Holger Holthausen) Online-OFB Zwei neue Ortsfamilienbücher sind hinzugekommen: * Faulbrück, Niederschlesien, Kreis Reichenbach: Rainer Schönfeld hat eine Sammlung von Zufallsfunden für diesen Ort zusammengestellt, gesucht werden Interessierte für die weitere Arbeit. * Spantekow, im Landkreis Vorpommern-Greifswald von Marcel Anterhaus vom Pommerscher Greif e.V. Allen Bearbeitern ein herzliches Dankeschön. (Herbert Juling)
>> Read More